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, 70,000 have been killed since protests against syrian president assad. robert frod testified at a robert ford testified at a hearing. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through the street, chanting, peaceful. what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. we are now two years into that syria and uprising. for two leady years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in the works. then it bet on moscow to play a constructive role. this is the assad who is bombing villages in syria. this is the assad who is ordering teenagers tortured. frankly, he is engaged in murdering his populist. the ancient city is now in ruins. 70,000 syrians are dead. a million refugees has spilled into neighb
and the syrian opposition to haste and assad'shasten the end of rule. he has lost his lead agency -- .etters --legitimacy to rule we have been clear that the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people would be a serious and tragic mistake. we also share israel's raid concerned about the transfer of chemical or other weapons to terrorists, like has the law, -- like hezbollah, which might be used against israel. finally, we continue consultation on iran. we agree that a nuclear armed iran would be a threat to the and israel.he world we agree on our goal -- we do not have a policy of containment when it comes to a nuclear iraq. our policy is to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. we prefer to resolve this diplomatically. there is still time to do so. must understand the need to meet their international obligations. international community will increase the pressure on the iranian government. the united states will continue to work closely with israel on steps. i will repeat -- all options are on the table. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from getting those weapons.
that they have been hopeful, that they think there is strategic distress over the king of the assad regime. they are more relaxed about that. a much more relaxed about egypt. instead of believing the u.s. or "-- will reorder the middle east, i find that this is a sober kind of summit, about what is doable, and what is not doable. there is a lot about the new israeli government, which i am happy to discuss in the question and answer. thank you very much. >> thank you. mike? >> thank you. it is good to be doing this. it is good to be on this panel with my colleagues. one of the great strengths about the washington institute, which makes it so nice to work here, to have colleagues like dennis and david, who are a great source of wisdom on this topic. i apologize to my dearest to have hd screens to have to watch me watch -- what to watch me eat lunch. we begin these things by saying, welcome mr. secretary, members of congress. nobody knows any different. [laughter] that is the benefit of live stream. i was asked to do this in part because the last presidential trip to the middle east, rather t
on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan took a leading role in the political transition to a more stable government. we are looking at strengthening the syrian opposition. we share concerns about violence spilling across the borders. i want to make it clear. the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of some many refugees inevitably is showing. from day, they are far home, but this is a heavy burden. need the international community to step up and help shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are these single largest donor of assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped jordan, and for days i have been announcing that my administration will provide jordan with an additional $200 million in budget support as it cares for syrian refugees and jordanian communities affected by this crisis. this will mean more assistance with basic services including education f
weapons. there were reports from syria that the president assad regime used chemical weapons against the rebels and the united states reached the conclusion that that is probably not so. this situation is close to the brink of forcing the united states to intervene in some way to prevent crossing this redline. president obama's trip to the region, including jordan, is hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees and highlighted the fact that the situation on the ground in syria is not getting better. there is no sign that it will get better. it does not seem the united states has a response to this ongoing challenge. guest: the united states has been the biggest donor in terms of humanitarian and financial aid to the syrian opposition. close to $500 million so far. also giving logistical and to indications training. we are told there is some training and intelligence being given to the militants, parts of the opposition. we need to understand what is going on in syria is looking like a civil war. a civil war between extremist islamic militant groups that are not real militias. there are
his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is a kinship between shia and alouites, is a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within their record to help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like rushing, when people see an uprising in spirit, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? --is simplistic to say that more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on the turn, that people
-- in iraq. >> of syria, we got off on the wrong foot. the president declared publicly that assad of syria has to go. that was a trustee had to make. that he made. one would assume that declaring a publicly involves a commitment by the united states, which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that therefore we have the means and strategy for achieving and objective. -- that objective. as soon turned out this was rhetorical, without a real capacity for follow-through. so we went to the un and demanded the security council support us on this. andrussians and chinese said we do not share this conclusion and we will not join you in forcing assad out and we object of the resolution fell. the russians and chinese, having engaged in this stance that is infantile and disgusting, the words used by our ambassador to the un, which is not a way of soliciting their report for -- their support for further comment policy. policy.n it became clear that the opposition, some of it involves some of our friends, some of it involves the infiltration of al qaeda types into syria. some of it
war continues to rage on, president bashar al-assad and his associates are resorting increasingly with other indiscriminate capabilities that terrorize innocent syrians and increase further the flow of refugees out of syria. former secretary panetta discussed the possibility of more robust options for military support last year. and he agreed to bring this matter to his counterparts in brussels. the recent decisions by the french and the british that provided assistance directly to the syrian opposition suggests that the position and nato is by no means unified. admiral come i hope you will provide us with some concept of our current thinking compared to that of our european partnerships, as it relates to syria and possible additional roles for the alliance beyond the deployment. eucom responsibilities include managing military engagement and cooperation, including through the nato and russia council. this includes russia's cooperation with the coalition equipment out of afghanistan, along the northern distribution network through russia and over 110 military to military activitie
to rebels inside syria, offering an alternative to the government of bashar al-assad, who's been a bad person. we want to see him go. man, andng this other information technology executive who lives in texas, and it goes on to say he is of kurdish dissent and may have seen a plus since he has been criticized for not reaching out to syria more. some council members say he was the choice of syria's muslim brotherhood, a group that had been banned and persecuted under the assad regime and that played a powerful role. then it goes on to say that mr. hito advocated for muslim americans as a representative of the council on american-islamic relations. concerningghtly particularly since i have all these different families of all different denominations and faiths telling me of their concerns of what takes place with some of the people currently in syria. for aadquarters, the need new fbi headquarters has been in the news lately. received 35 proposals from developers and communities in the metro area interested in hosting a new headquarters building. can you bring the committee updates first w
that hezbollah's ally assad's regime has sock piled rockets, we will guard against that. i made it clear to assad and all that follow his orders, we will chemicalate the use of weapons or the transfer of those weapons. the world is watching and we will hold you accountable. [applause] the syrian people have the right to be free from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill s own people than relinquish power. assad must go so a serious future can begin. because true stability in syria depends on establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders while making peace with countries beyond them. that this is what i think about when i think about israel's security. when i think about israel's security i also think about the people who have a living memory of the holocaust. faced with a government that is called for iran's disruption. no wound their israel views this as a threat. this is not simply a challenge for israel but it is a danger for the entire world, including the united states. [applause] a nuclear-armed iran will raise the r
. but maliki has his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is it the kinship between shia and alouites, is it a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within iraq? help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like saddam's regime, when people see an uprising in syria, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. it is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on th
his own people than relinquish power. assad must go so the serious future can begin. because true stability in syria begins upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders while making peace with countries beyond them. these are the things i think about when i think about israel's security. when i consider israel's security i also think about a people who have a living memory of the holocaust. faced with the prospect of a nuclear-armed iranian government that has called for israel's destruction. it's no wonder israelis view this as an existential threat. but this is not simply a challenge for israel. it is a danger for the entire world including the united tates. a nuclear-armed iran would raise the risk of nuclear terrorism, it would undermine the nonproliferation regime, it would spark an arms race in ra volatile region, and it would embolden a government that has shown no respects for the rights of its own people or the responsibilities of nations. that's why america's built a coalition to increase the cost
to i think the prime minister for that answer. everyone is appalled by the actions of the assad regime. but he will know that there is not only a lack of unity among syrian opposition groups, but there's also the known presence of al qaeda backed organization on the ground in c. does the prime minister understand the widespread concern that remains about the idea of seeking supplies and weapons to rebels? >> i think the leader of the opposite puts the point right. there is widespread concern about the nature of the opposition and the argument i think we have to engage in is this. are we more likely to help the good elements of the opposition by standing back, or are we more likely to help by getting into and shaping and helping and giving this technical assistance so we can play a part in building up the syrian opposition so they are legitimate and credible alternatives to this hateful regime? it is worth recalling and we should all recall the fact that current policies are not working for the people of syria. 70,000 people are dead, and this hateful regime is still in place. >> he's r
of men and women and children in syria right now. the fact that hizbollah's ally -- the assad regime -- has stockpiles of chemical weapons only heightens the urgency. we will continue to cooperate closely to guard against that danger. i've made it clear to bashar al- assad and all who follow his orders: we will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people, or the transfer of those weapons to terrorists. the world is watching, we will hold you accountable. the syrian people have the right to be freed from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill his own people than relinquish power. assad must go so that syria's future can begin. because true stability in syria depends upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people -- one that protects all communities within its borders, while making peace with countries beyond them. these are the things i think about when i think about israel's security. when i consider israel's security, i also think about a people who have a living memory of the holocaust, faced with the prospect of a nuclear-armed irania
put out was the use of chemical weapons. there were reports from syria that the president assad regime used chemical weapons against the rebels and the united states reached the conclusion that that is probably not so. this situation is close to the brink of forcing the united states to intervene in some way to prevent crossing this redline. president obama's trip to the region, including jordan, is hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees and highlighted the fact that the situation on the ground in syria is not getting better. there is no sign that it will get better. it does not seem the united states has a response to this ongoing challenge. guest: the united states has been the biggest donor in terms of humanitarian and financial aid to the syrian opposition. close to $500 million so far. also giving logistical and to indications training. we are told there is some training and intelligence being given to the militants, parts of the opposition. we need to understand what is going on in syria is looking like a civil war. extremistr between islamic militant groups that are not real
for your thank you. >> thank you. >> let me do a little follow-up. if and when assad falls, you talked about ethnic cleansing. the have contingency plans to deal with the syrian stockpile of weapons? comm does not. anythingu tell us about that? >> not on a non-classified level. >> thank you very much. senator mccain had an interesting question with regard to patriot batteries in turkey. who put those there? mission and on nato assigned by the nato alliance. is there. states place inn a southwestern turkey along the border. reachedhis a decision ?y the nato leadership >> it was a native decision in this was a nato mission. those are the nations that contributed the actual batteries, the 28 member nations have people who are part of this. command and control is made up from people from all the different companies -- different countries, but it's very much a nato mission. >> what does it take for nato to make that decision? >> we had to bring it to the nato council, which is 28 nations represented by ambassadors in belgium. it was discussed there and then the ambassadors went back to capi
witnesses. first witness, craig fugate, a management assad -- emergency management agency. it was a really outstanding effort you made from our state and the other states that were affected. he began his career as an emergency manager and a firefighter, emergency paramedic, and a lieutenant with -- county fire rescue. 2001 he became a director of the florida division of the board c management. to see.elighted welcome to this hearing and thank you for your testimony. -- are you a native of new york? >> in native of new york. >> he is the honorable shaun donovan, secretary to the department of housing and development. he became secretary in january 12 -- january 2009. before his appointment, he served as a deputy assistant secretary for multifamily housing during the clinton administration. he later served as commissioner of the department of housing preservation in new york city. we thank you for joining us. we look forward to your testimony. statesnger to the united senate where she once toiled on the finance committee. great to see her again, secretary jo-ellen darcy. said assistant secre
was a choice of syria's muslim brotherhood, a group have been banned and persecuted under the assad government, and plays a powerful role. -- it goes on to say was concerning since i had all these different families of .he nominations of faith new headquarters. the need for a new fbi headquarters has been in the news lately. correct my understanding is jsa as received 35 proposals in posted a new headquarters in building. can he bring the committee up to date? .n the status of the effort verye have grown out -- much outgrown our headquarters on pennsylvania avenue. t isn't -- the most architecturally public building. it is actually ugly, to be honest with you. but we have outgrown it and we have some like 20 entities brown -- something like 20 entities around. be in the capital region, near transportation and to assure that meets our security concerns. are 35nted out there applicants or proposals have been submitted. i'm not sure the timetable. i will have to get back to you on that. >> i have been concerned with the senate language targeted to go to a certain location. people ought to be ope
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)